Book Review: Baramulla Bomber by Clark Prasad

When Nimi from Readers Cosmos shared the blurb for Baramulla Bomber I was kind of intrigued because you don’t see to many books based on science fiction by Indian authors and to be very honest its not every day that you see debut writers taking up the subject of science fiction.
The first thing that caught my attention was this note in the beginning which had this this request from the author to the reviewers to not give away the plot of the story and that’s what I am going to do…there will be no details of the story in this review except whatever is mentioned in the blurb.

The story revolves around Mansur Haider, an aspiring cricketer from Kashmir. For some reason multiple intelligence agencies are tracking him. His girlfriend, Aahana Yajurvedi, is trying to locate her missing mountaineering team, who vanished after a mysterious earthquake strikes Shaksgam Valley. Investigating Mansur and the Shaksgam Valley incident is Swedish intelligence officer, Adolf Silfverskiold. In the middle of all this is Agastya Rathor, Indian home minister who is facing a dual China-Pakistan battlefront scenario and the challenge of finding a lasting solution to the Kashmir crisis.

Even though the story has a sci-fi angle and is based in India, the plot is very strong and you don’t really get the feeling that “oh, i don’t think that can happen”. The author  has definitely put in a lot of effort to research the different subjects that the story touches to make it very believable.

A lot is going on in the story, there are a lot of sub plots, characters and countries but the pace of the story remains very balanced and you want to keep going. Even though there are a lot of character, each of them have been given a proper part in the story….their presence is justified and the characters have been developed well.

The only thing thing that bothered me about the book was that I think the plot could have been a bit stronger if the author had not attempted to add everything .The story is  talking about spies, science, vedas, cricket, secret societies, UFO, Kashmir, UN sometimes even in one single chapter, so it kind of gets overwhelming at places. Instead if he had spent a little more time on giving details about the technology, had gone in a little detail of how the weapon that they are talking about was discovered, given me a reason as to why it wasn’t discovered till now etc. would have made it a much more intriguing read.

Overall, I would say I am not to sure about this book. The logic behind the concept makes sense but vital information is missing which leaves me with a lot if question in my mind. I applaud his attempt and I can definitely see the effort that went into the book, unfortunately it went into the wrong areas and I would not put it in the list of ” you have to read it” books

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