Murder In Amaravati : Book Review

I came across this book on Sunaina’s blog (which if you haven’t checked out till now you should, she is hell of a writer ) and was instantly drawn towards the very intriguing cover (No, I don’t judge a book by its cover…but an interesting cover helps πŸ˜‰ )
As the title tells you, this novel by first time author Sharath Komarraju revolves around a murder in Amaravati, a village on the bank of river Krishna in Andhra Pradesh. The victim is Padmavati, the village hostess. Her body is discovered in the locked temple of Kali, which situated next to the old banyan tree of the village.
The protagonist is head constable Venkat Reddy who has been handling petty crimes till now and now finds himself facing the dilemma whether to dismiss the case as suicide or get for the innocent looking deceased. Well as you can guess, he finally decides to do the latter and it is during the course of investigation that he discovers how men just wanted her, women hated her and those who were associated with her never wanted the skeletons to come out the closet, fearing family and society.
There are mainly seven suspects, each one has a very strong motive which are disclosed through the very detailed description and narration of the author. I must mention that the author has put in a lot of effort in plotting the characters and the story, which appears very simple but don’t be fooled by its simplicity, it has a lot of complicated angles.
I have always loved murder mysteries and I am usually able to figure out the killer but somehow while reading this book I kept second guessing myself till the end, apart from that the commendable plot and the simple language maintained my interest in the book and I wanted to read on and on.
So basically, I absolutely loved the book. It is definitely one of the best murder mysteries that I have read and I am definitely looking forward to other books by Komarraju
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  • good one πŸ™‚

  • Aparajita

    Thanks Apoorva πŸ™‚